Contact Us For Help

Browse by states:

Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in New Jersey

The Office of National Drug Control Policy states that New Jersey had more than 40,000 drug arrests in 2008 for drug use or possession. In New Jersey, cocaine continues to be the most widely used and abused drug. Crack continues to be easily accessible in New Jersey and is still the drug of choice in many of the poorer neighborhoods.

However, in New Jersey, heroin is the most widely abused drug. The low cost and high purity of the drug has lured many new users over the last few years, including young people in suburban areas. In the Southern New Jersey region, methamphetamine is the most accessible and commonly used secretly manufactured drug.

In the entire state of New Jersey, marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug. Most of the marijuana encountered in New Jersey comes from Mexico; however, marijuana from Canada and Jamaica has also been detected.

Pharmaceuticals such as Percocet, OxyContin, Xanax, Vicodin/Vicodin ES, and hydrocodone products are the most commonly abused of their kind in New Jersey. Further, the most frequently abused substances are GBL, Pseudoephedrine, and Ephedrine.

The 2006-2007 statistics from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), cites that 469,000 New Jersey citizens, ages 12 or older, admitted to using an illegal drug in the past month. Further, 11 percent of high school students in New Jersey admitted to abusing inhalants at least once in their lifespan. The 2006-2007 NSDUH data also reflects that 60,000 New Jersey 12-17 year olds confirmed past month use of an illegal drug.

The DEA and the state and local authorities stated that in 2008, there were 3 methamphetamine lab incidents in New Jersey. Additionally, under the DEA's Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program an excess of 2,500 marijuana plants were seized and destroyed in the state. In New Jersey, there were 27 drug courts that had been running for at least 2 years as of July 14, 2009; 3 drug courts were being implemented.

In 2008, 33.1 percent of the individuals serving a Federal sentencing in New Jersey committed a drug violation; 30 percent of the drug cases were relating to powder cocaine. New Jersey had 25,436 offenders in correctional institutions on January 1, 2009; 29 percent of the prisoners committed drug violations. Almost all of the drug offenses ending in imprisonment were for sale and distribution.

There were 126,390 adult probationers and 15,043 adult parolees in New Jersey by December 31, 2007. The El Paso Intelligence Center states that New Jersey had no children who were affected by methamphetamine labs in 2008. However, there were 674 fatal crashes and 724 fatalities in the state in 2007; 72 drivers, 15 passengers, 13 pedestrians and 3 cyclists tested positive for illegal substances. New Jersey has had a minimum of 133 deaths resulting from the use of non-pharmaceutical drug, fentanyl, since mid-April 2006.

New Jersey had 64,838 treatment admissions for drugs or alcohol in 2008; there were 60,243 treatment admissions in 2007; and in 2006, there were 55,870 treatment admissions.

Recent Articles
Statistics reflect that one in five adult Americans grew in a household that included an alcoholic. As a result, these children face a bigger risk for developing emotional problems than children who do not have a parent who is an alcoholic. Alcoholism tends to run in families; children with alcoholi The child may perceive himself as the main reason his mother or father drinks, blaming himself for their issue. In addition, the child may fret consistently about the issue at home. He may worry that the alcoholic parent will get sick, and may also fear violence between his parents. Parents suffering from alcoholism may make the child feel as though there is an awful secret at home. The embarrassed child consequently does not invite friends over and fears asking anyone for assistance. Due to the child’s disappointment in his alcoholic parent, he may find it difficult to trust Regardless of how the child behaves, the alcoholic parent will suddenly switch from being loving to angry. A child needs to have a regular daily schedule; this is important to his well-being; but in the home of an alcoholic parent bedtimes and mealtimes are always changing. The child may develop an
There are typically three steps that are included in alcoholism treatment after the diagnosis of the disorder has taken place: intervention, detoxification, and rehabilitation. Because many alcoholics do not realize that their drinking is out of control, intervention is often necessary. Once upon a The best approach is to assist individuals in realizing the adverse impact alcohol abuse is placing on their life, and on the lives of those close to them. They can strive for alcoholism treatment, which teaches them how to lead a more healthful and sober life. If family members and employers are ho Alcohol withdrawal is typically done in a controlled, supervised atmosphere, where medications is used to alleviate the painful withdrawal symptoms. In general, detoxification takes 4 to 7 days. In addition, an examination for other medical issue is imperative. For example, liver and blood clotting alcoholism treatment also teaches the individual the importance of eating a balanced diet with vitamin supplements. After detoxification, alcohol rehabilitation programs can help the recovering alcohol refrain from using alcohol in the future. These programs tend to provide counseling, psychological