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Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in New Jersey

The Office of National Drug Control Policy states that New Jersey had more than 40,000 drug arrests in 2008 for drug use or possession. In New Jersey, cocaine continues to be the most widely used and abused drug. Crack continues to be easily accessible in New Jersey and is still the drug of choice in many of the poorer neighborhoods.

However, in New Jersey, heroin is the most widely abused drug. The low cost and high purity of the drug has lured many new users over the last few years, including young people in suburban areas. In the Southern New Jersey region, methamphetamine is the most accessible and commonly used secretly manufactured drug.

In the entire state of New Jersey, marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug. Most of the marijuana encountered in New Jersey comes from Mexico; however, marijuana from Canada and Jamaica has also been detected.

Pharmaceuticals such as Percocet, OxyContin, Xanax, Vicodin/Vicodin ES, and hydrocodone products are the most commonly abused of their kind in New Jersey. Further, the most frequently abused substances are GBL, Pseudoephedrine, and Ephedrine.

The 2006-2007 statistics from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), cites that 469,000 New Jersey citizens, ages 12 or older, admitted to using an illegal drug in the past month. Further, 11 percent of high school students in New Jersey admitted to abusing inhalants at least once in their lifespan. The 2006-2007 NSDUH data also reflects that 60,000 New Jersey 12-17 year olds confirmed past month use of an illegal drug.

The DEA and the state and local authorities stated that in 2008, there were 3 methamphetamine lab incidents in New Jersey. Additionally, under the DEA's Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program an excess of 2,500 marijuana plants were seized and destroyed in the state. In New Jersey, there were 27 drug courts that had been running for at least 2 years as of July 14, 2009; 3 drug courts were being implemented.

In 2008, 33.1 percent of the individuals serving a Federal sentencing in New Jersey committed a drug violation; 30 percent of the drug cases were relating to powder cocaine. New Jersey had 25,436 offenders in correctional institutions on January 1, 2009; 29 percent of the prisoners committed drug violations. Almost all of the drug offenses ending in imprisonment were for sale and distribution.

There were 126,390 adult probationers and 15,043 adult parolees in New Jersey by December 31, 2007. The El Paso Intelligence Center states that New Jersey had no children who were affected by methamphetamine labs in 2008. However, there were 674 fatal crashes and 724 fatalities in the state in 2007; 72 drivers, 15 passengers, 13 pedestrians and 3 cyclists tested positive for illegal substances. New Jersey has had a minimum of 133 deaths resulting from the use of non-pharmaceutical drug, fentanyl, since mid-April 2006.

New Jersey had 64,838 treatment admissions for drugs or alcohol in 2008; there were 60,243 treatment admissions in 2007; and in 2006, there were 55,870 treatment admissions.

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