Contact Us For Help

Browse by states:

Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in Kansas

Throughout Kansas, cocaine HCI and crack cocaine are easily accessible in gram, ounce, and kilogram quantities. Typically, cocaine derives from supply sources in Texas and California that are connected with Mexican international distribution organizations. A lot of the cocaine is turned into crack, which is packaged in plastic bags, and sold in Kansas's inner-city neighborhoods.

In most of Kansas, the availability of Mexican black tar heroin continues to be limited to small, user quantities. However, larger quantities can be located in Wichita and Kansas City. Per law enforcement officials, there is little or no heroin available in western Kansas and only small availability in Topeka.

In Kansas, marijuana continues to be the most widely abused illicit substance. Because of its higher potency, hydroponic marijuana is in high demand, ultimately commanding a much higher price than Mexican marijuana.

Throughout Kansas, crystal methamphetamine produced and trafficked by Mexican drug trafficking organizations is commonly found. This type of meth is typically high in purity and is quite inexpensive. MDMA (ecstasy) continues to available only in small quantities throughout Kansas. Still, it continues to be popular with young users (teenagers and young adults), and is also commonly used in the homosexual community.

In Kansas, OxyContin remains the pharmaceutical drug of choice. Because of its consistent purity and quality, users prefer it over street drugs such as heroin. Per 2005-2006 data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 177,000 Kansas citizens ages 12 or older reported prior month use of an illegal drug.

Per the 2008 Communities That Care survey, 16.2 percent of Kansas' students admitted to using marijuana at some point in their lifetime. The 2008 survey also cited that 9.1 percent of Kansas students admitted being drunk or high at school during the past year. More statistics from this survey revealed that 4.1 percent of high school students had sold illicit drugs in the past year. The 2005-2006 NSDUH data revealed that 9 percent of Kansas 12-17 year olds claimed prior month use of an illegal drug.

There were 10,451 full-time law enforcement employees in Kansas as of October 31, 2006; 7,085 were officers and 3,366 were civilians. Kansas Bureau of Investigation (KBI) Special Operations Division (SOD) is made up of 3 Narcotics Enforcement Units; these units are located in Topeka, Wichita, and Great Bend. SOD special agents conduct investigations of major narcotics producers and traffickers within Kansas.

Mexican poly-drug trafficking organizations control most of Kansas' methamphetamine, cocaine and marijuana distribution. Hispanic organizations control powder cocaine's wholesale distribution, while several ethnic groups are responsible for cocaine's retail level distribution. Within Kansas, Asian traffickers are the main source of MDMA.

In 2006, Kansas had 15,368 treatment admissions for drugs or alcohol; in 2005 there were 15,261; and in 2004 there were 15,496.

Recent Articles
Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence not only affect adults in a negative manner, but also have an adverse effect on a substantial amount of adolescents and young adults between 12 and 20 years old. Although drinking under the age of 21 is illegal, teens still find ways of obtaining alcohol. Many be Most boys who experiment with alcohol tend to do so at around age 11 while girls try alcohol at around age 13. Statistics show that by the time most boys reach age 14, 41 percent of them have had least one drink. The average age for Americans to start drinking frequently is 15.9 years old. Teenagers who start drinking before age 15 are five times more likely to be alcohol dependent than those who start drinking at age 21. Moreover, more than 3 million teenagers are die-hard alcoholics, and many millions more have a severe drinking issue that they are incapable of handling on their own Yearly, more than 5,000 deaths of people below 21 years old are connected to underage drinking. The 3 main reasons of death for 15 to 24 year-olds are car crashes, homicides and suicides—alcohol is always the main factor in all three incidents. Binge drinking, often starts at around age 13 then i
It is common for people to experiment with alcohol and drugs during their adolescent stage. However, it is sad that teenagers frequently don’t pay attention to the connection between their actions today and the penalties tomorrow. They tend to feel as though they are exempt and immune to the issue Consuming alcohol and tobacco during the adolescent stage has adverse health effects. While some teens stop at the experimentation stage, or continue to use only every now and then, without major problems; others will start growing dependent on drugs and alcohol, transitioning on to more serious dru Teens who are from families with a family history of alcohol abuse, teens who are depressed, teens who lack self-esteem, and teens who feel alienated or like they don't fit in are vulnerable to alcoholism. Teenagers tend to abuse different types of drugs, legal and illegal. Legal drugs include alcoh Marijuana and alcohol use in high school has become frequent. Drug use causes a host of adverse consequences, including the elevated chance of severe drug use in later life, failing in school, and distorted judgment, which can result in accidents, violence, unplanned and unsafe sex, and suicide amon