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Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in Connecticut

In Connecticut, cocaine is commonly abused. Alongside cocaine, heroin is the biggest drug threat in Connecticut, . Heroin abuse continues to be widespread in Connecticut, , affecting suburban and urban areas. In Connecticut, , heroin demand is high and can be accessed easily. Heroin's popularity is partially because of the rising availability of low cost, high purity heroin, which can be effectively snorted or smoked instead of injected. On the street, heroin is sold in small glassine bags with some form of marking or brand name stated on the package.

Most of the Connecticut's commercial grade marijuana comes from Mexico or southwestern America. MDMA (ecstasy) is commonly available and abused in Connecticut, ; it is a popular drug choice among college age individuals. Current investigations show that the diversion of Vicodin and oxycodone products (OxyContin) remains an issue in Connecticut, .

Per 2004-2005 statistics from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 262,000 Connecticut, citizens ages 12 or older admitted to prior month use of an illegal drug. More 2004-2005 NSDUH results reflect that 98,000 Connecticut, citizens reported illegal drug abuse or dependence within the prior year. A 2005 survey reflects that 40 percent of Connecticut, high school students reported using marijuana at least once; half of Connecticut, high school seniors reported lifetime marijuana use. Per 2004-2005 NSDUH data, 34,000 Connecticut, 12-17 year olds stated prior month use of an illegal drug. As of October 31, 2006, in Connecticut, , there were 9,703 full-time law enforcement employees; specifically, 7,875 officers and 1,828 civilians.

Connecticut, is located near New York City, and is also a key transit and destination drug area. In 2006, the DEA and state and local authorities reported 3 meth lab incidents in Connecticut, . Further, as part of the DEA's Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program, there were 1,543 cultivated marijuana plants that were seized and eradicated. In Connecticut, , there were 4 drug courts that had been operating for more at least two years as of April 16, 2007. At that time, there were no more drug courts in existence or being implemented in Connecticut, .

In 2006, 51.1 percent of California defendants who were Federally-sentenced had committed a drug offense; 54 percent of these cases involved crack cocaine. On January 1, 2008, there were 19,438 incarcerated individuals in Connecticut, . Almost 1,800 of the inmates committed a violation, which involved selling a hallucinogenic or narcotic substance.

On January 1, 2008, the amount of Connecticut, offenders being supervised in the community was 3,938. The Department of Corrections' Objective Classification System states that more than 88 percent of the inmates coming into the system have a history of substance abuse; this indicates a great need for some kind of substance abuse treatment. The El Paso Intelligence Center states that there were no injured or affected children relating to meth labs in Connecticut, during 2007. In 2006, there were 46,491 treatment admissions for drug or alcohol in ConnConnecticut, ecticut. Those needing drug treatment are urged to treatment at one of these facilities.

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Although there is no general profile of alcoholism, most alcoholics tend to see no harm in their drinking behavior. An alcoholic will generally deny, rationalize, intellectualize and justify her drinking for a number of causes. The most frequent reason is that she is not a hardcore drunk, suffering She will rationalize her drinking because most her friends and significant others drink, or they haven’t had any severe consequences. She will justify drinking because of her career, family or school obligations, often blaming it on the pressures of these environments. She will intellectualize dri When an alcoholic drinks for continuous and long periods of time she may develop specific physical symptoms after she stops drinking. Alcoholism withdrawal or alcohol withdrawal has a number of adverse symptoms, such as elevated hand tremors, nausea or vomiting, visual, auditory and tactile hallucin There is a common misconception that individuals who abuse hard liquor are more likely to become dependent than one who abuses beer or wine. Not true. Alcoholism withdrawal can also happen when the individual uses or abuses beer, wine, and hard liquor. Individuals who are in this predicament are urg
Consuming alcohol is perilous for children and teens and sometimes for adults. Alcohol is a drug, which is most abused by teenagers. Many children report having their first drink at as early as age 10 or 11, some younger. In today’s society, it is not difficult for children to get the wrong impres Alcohol is a depressant, meaning it's a chemical substance that slows down the brain. Like several other drugs, alcohol can change how an individual’s thinks, speaks, and sees things, often in an adverse manner. The individual might become imbalanced, cries, or gets into arguments and fights with Besides inflicting damages to the body (e.g. liver disease), alcohol can also cause individuals to act or say things in a manner that they do not mean. They are also capable of hurting themselves or other people, especially while driving an automobile. An individual who has had too much to drink mig Because alcohol can result in serious issues, the citizens and government leaders in America have decided that children are prohibited from purchasing or using alcohol. By regulating the drinking age as 21, they hope more mature individuals will make proper decisions about alcohol. For example, peo