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Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol addiction is the uncontrollable need for an intoxicating liquid, such as beer, wine, and other hard liquors. When an individual craves alcohol and is incapable of limiting their drinking, they are suffering from alcoholism. If an individual undergoes withdrawal symptoms including nausea, sweating, tremors, or anxiety when he stops drinking alcohol, or they have the need to drink larger doses of alcohol to feel "high", they are more than to be an alcoholic.

Some people may think the alcoholic should be able to stop drinking by applying willpower; however, alcoholism is more complex than that. The craving an alcoholic feels for alcohol is so tremendous it stifles his ability to cease drinking. Most alcoholics need help to stop drinking. However, with the treatment and support from family and friends, an individual can overcome their Alcohol addiction. Still, unfortunately, some alcoholics are unable to cease drinking despite these types of assistance.

According to scientists, an individual with alcohol addiction in their family is more susceptible to alcoholism if they decide to drink. Other factors also include the individual's environment and traumatic experiences they may have undergone in their life. Alcoholism can cause destruction, physically and mentally. Half of all crimes, murders, suicides and accidental deaths are related to alcohol use. Alcohol addiction can also lead to serious health issues mainly brain damage, cancer, heart disease, and liver diseases. An alcoholic who chooses to keep drinking has a lowered life expectancy of 10 to 15 years.

Excessive alcohol intake can destroy brain cells and can result in brain damage. Alcohol largely disrupts the central nervous system's structure and operation, distorting its capability of retrieving, consolidating, and processing data. When used moderately, alcohol can affect cognitive abilities while greater amounts interrupt the brain's oxygen supply, resulting in a blackout when completely drunk.

Alcohol addiction can also cause irregular heartbeats, and alcohol abusers are at greater risk of elevated blood pressure, heart attacks, and other heart destruction. It can also can impair vision (drunk driving), destroy sexual function, cause slow circulation, and result in malnutrition. In addition, skin and pancreatic disorders can evolve, making the bones and muscles feeble, and causing a decline in the immune system.

To overcome their addiction, the alcoholic must have the desire to cease their addiction to alcohol. They must have an enormous desire to cease being an alcoholic. They must also try to pinpoint why they are an alcoholic, what leads them to drink; this is an important part of solving the issue. If the reason is because of a traumatic experience they have suffered, they must let go and seek deliverance from it. They must also be willing to forgive themself and others, and seek counseling to help them with the healing process. Overcoming Alcohol addiction starts with admitting, then getting the necessary help.

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Statistics reflect that one in five adult Americans grew in a household that included an alcoholic. As a result, these children face a bigger risk for developing emotional problems than children who do not have a parent who is an alcoholic. Alcoholism tends to run in families; children with alcoholi The child may perceive himself as the main reason his mother or father drinks, blaming himself for their issue. In addition, the child may fret consistently about the issue at home. He may worry that the alcoholic parent will get sick, and may also fear violence between his parents. Parents suffering from alcoholism may make the child feel as though there is an awful secret at home. The embarrassed child consequently does not invite friends over and fears asking anyone for assistance. Due to the child’s disappointment in his alcoholic parent, he may find it difficult to trust Regardless of how the child behaves, the alcoholic parent will suddenly switch from being loving to angry. A child needs to have a regular daily schedule; this is important to his well-being; but in the home of an alcoholic parent bedtimes and mealtimes are always changing. The child may develop an